This past month I have shared a few ideas of some games you can create for your child using giant buttons that I found at JoAnn Fabrics.  I shared how to create a Cookie Monster game and a color matching busy bag game.  Well, since we are one a color matching kick at our house, I thought I would share one more game with you that has to do with color matching… A color matching file folder game!  This is so incredibly easy to make, but your toddler will love playing it with you!

Match The Colors Board Game

Match The Colors Board Game

Start by grabbing your supplies:

  • File Folder
  • Giant Buttons
  • Note Cards or Card Stock
  • Sharpie
  • Crayons or Colored Pencils

 

I decided to use a legal-size file folder because the giant buttons are actually giant!  I wouldn’t have gotten as many squares on the game board using a letter-size file folder.  Take your file folder and opening it up.  Draw a squiggly line from end to end of the file folder to create a game board using a Sharpie.  I used a black Sharpie.  Follow that same squiggly line to complete your game board.

Match The Colors Board Game - Sharpie And File Folder

Taking your giant button, draw lines to create squares on your game board.  By using the button, you are able to make sure you have enough space to play without having the button take over space on the square next to the square you are currently on.

Match The Colors Board Game - Draw Board Spaces

Taking your crayons or colored pencils, color in the squares using the colors you are focusing on for the game.  I used red, blue, green and orange.  This was actually a very relaxing time to sit and color.  I read an article recently, that discussed how coloring can help reduce stress.  That must be why I love sitting and coloring on really tough days!

When you finish coloring the game board it’s time to make the game cards.  Either cut card stock to create small cards, or cut note cards in half.  Color one side of the card using the colors of the squares on the game board.

Match The Colors Board Game - Game Cards

Now that your game is created, it’s time to play!  Take the game cards and place them face down in a pile on the game board.  All players will start at the beginning of the game board.

Match The Colors Board Game - Final

The first player will start by pulling a card and move the giant button to that color square on the game board based off of the color card they drew.  The next player will pull a card and move their giant button to that color square on the game board.  Repeat until one player gets to the end of the game board.

When you are done playing, store all of the items for the game in a Ziploc bag that you can staple to the file folder.  This makes it easy to keep everything together.

Match The Colors Board Game - Storing

You can also change up how you play the game.  If your kiddo is working on counting, make game cards with numbers.  If you have an elementary school kiddo, you can turn their homework into a game!  In order to roll the dice, you have to spell or write a spelling word correctly.  You could use flashcards to find out how many spaces you could move.  The possibilities of game ideas are endless, so you get to be creative with how you use the board.

Hope you all enjoyed this series of game ideas using giant buttons.  Next month, I will be featuring games and activities that help build the pincer grasp.  The pincer grasp is where the pointer finger and thumb squeeze together to hold an object.  Strengthening the pincer gasp helps support fine motor skills, handwriting skills and hand-eye coordination.

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About The Organized Mama

My name is Jessica and I am the founder and creative director of The Organized Mama, a professional organizing firm and blog. I was born and raised in Minnesota and currently live in Illinois. I graduated Indiana University with a degree in elementary education. My passion is teaching others how to live an organized life. I am a certified professional organizer with the National Association of Productivity and Organizational Professionals (NAPO).

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